Day 24: What’s up DOC!

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I have taken the past couple of days to brush up my knowledge of html and to familiarize myself with its newest features. In the advent of the web, Hypertext Markup Language, more commonly known as html, was the language used to create web pages. Since then, the web has become vastly more sophisticated, with the creation of CSS and Javascript, among other technologies. As the web has become more advanced, so has html as a markup language.

The most recent iteration of html, html5, has build upon the foundation of its predecessors with both the developers and users in mind. Prior to html5, developers were forced to use the div element very generously. Now, developers can use html elements such as header, article, section, and footer to markup their web content. Not only are these new elements helpful for teams of developers to create and keep html documents organized, but this also helps users who access web pages via accessibility devices. The html5 document declaration is also valid for XHTML.

html5 also includes updated element attributes, embedded video, and animations. Forms, in html5, can now input email, date, telephone number, and time types. All of these attributes can help search engines when they index html pages to assist the users in finding more relevant information to their query. Previously, developers would have to employ a service like Adobe Flash to embed a video into a webpage. With html5 video, Flash and other services are now optional for embedded video for now. Canvas, an html5 feature that requires Javascript, can be used to create vector images in a web application.

Both the web and html have come along way, since their creation. Hypertext markup language 5 can now be combined with CSS to create responsive web pages. The most advanced features of html5 require the use of Javascript, such as Canvas and the  Geolocation API. This is only really scratching the surface of html5 (I will cover more advanced features of html5 in a later blog post).

Not all browsers have transitioned to completely support html5. A browser that does not support it may not recognize html5 elements and the content is ignored. To address this issue, html5 shiv was created. Shiv creates  in Javascript, so that the browser can natively recognize and style. Thanks to Josh Hibbert, I have this awesome Sublime Text 3 html5 shiv snippet.

Until next time!

#StayCoding